Shiva Studies

As cannabis legalization progresses across the United States as well as in countries around the world we are starting to see more research studies performed regarding many different aspects surrounding this herb. In the last few months alone we have seen some incredible conclusions from some of the more recent research performed. Let’s take a look at 3 random cannabis studies from 2017 thus far.

Consumers Still Utilize the Black Market

The Cannabis Consumers Coalition recently released a report regarding how legal cannabis consumers obtain their cannabis. Of the 73% of the respondents who lived in a legal state nearly half of them reported still buying cannabis the old-fashioned way. This report showed that nearly 46% of cannabis consumers still purchase their products from the black market in comparison to only 12% who said they regularly purchased from a legal regulated recreational dispensary. Thanks to many states allowing for home growing 15% of respondents relied on their own crops. Many people attribute the reliance on the black market to the cost of cannabis in legal dispensaries, especially recreational dispensaries where oftentimes consumers face taxes of 15% or greater.

Cannabis Could Reduce Crack Use

There’s been a lot of news recently regarding how cannabis can help with the opiate epidemic that is plaguing countries around the world. There have also been countless cases of anecdotal evidence from people around the world stating cannabis helped them to kick illicit drugs such as heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine. A new study coming from researchers at the BC Center in Vancouver British Columbia Canada took a look at how cannabis may be effective at also reducing crack use amongst residents of low-income communities and the results were startling. Over the course of 3 years, researchers at the BC Centre on Substance Abuse surveyed more than 100 crack cocaine abusers in the city. The results showed that when cannabis was utilized intentionally to help reduce crack use, there was a 15% decline in dependency. A similar study in Brazil saw aligning results with over 68% of participants ceasing to utilize crack after a 9-month period with reduced cannabis use as well after 3 months.

Cannabis is Replacing Prescriptions

As mentioned above there’s been a lot of talk surrounding cannabis as an alternative treatment for combating the opiate epidemic that is plaguing the nation and countries around the world. Opiates, however, are not the only prescription drugs that are widely abused and they are also not the only one’s cannabis is proving to help people kick. In fact, cannabis is actually helping people kick more than just illicit drug and prescription drug addiction it is also helping with alcoholism and addiction to nicotine. Recent statistics arising from data collected from patients enrolled in the MMPR program in Canada showed that 63% of enrollees were utilizing cannabis in place of prescription medication with success. The major prescription drugs being replaced were classified as Opioids (30%), Benzodiazepines (16%) and Antidepressants (12%). Of the patients who participated in this study, 39% of them reported less adverse side effects with cannabis in comparison to the prescription drugs they replaced. 27% of respondents felt that cannabis was safer than their prescription drugs. 25% of respondents reported replacing alcohol with cannabis and 12% reported kicking addiction to cigarettes/tobacco products with cannabis as well!

Results Worth Fighting For

These are results worth fighting for! For many we have known for years the healing powers that cannabis has to offer. For others, they are just awakening to all of the benefits the world has to gain from this miraculous natural plant. Studies and reports such as these will continue to amaze the world and will only increase in frequency over the coming years as the walls of cannabis prohibition come tumbling down around the globe.

Article courtesy of Expert Contributor: AshleyP from CannaLance (CannaLance.com, @CannaLance, @MJWriter87)

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